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08 May 2010 @ 01:20 pm
Election Thoughts  
We ended up staying up way too late on Thursday night, having got sucked into the election coverage on the bbc news site. Ipswich was originally intending to declare at about 2am, but when that got pushed back to 3am or later we decided to go to bed and not wait for it ;) Conservative gain here - to be honest I don't think there was a candidate I actually wanted to win in our seat :/ The previous Labour MP seemed to do exactly what the party wanted without a thought of his own (and I've issues with things his party did whilst in power that he voted for), the new Tory MP is son of a previous Tory MP in Suffolk & I'm not a great fan of the concept of political dynasties (leaving aside my general non-agreement with the Tory party's politics), the Lib Dem candidate was non-local so clearly none of our local Lib Dems could be arsed (which niggles at me as I tend to agree with them, and there's a fair number of Lib Dems on the local council, so it's not like there's not a party presence in Ipswich). There were 6 more candidates, 2 independent and 4 minor parties, none of whom were in with a chance and none of whom I agreed with anyway (tho one of the independents would've made a good protest vote if I'd been that way inclined).

We'd figured when we got up we'd see what the new government was, too, not just our new MP. But of course we've turned out not to have government yet - and it seems hard to see how they can hammer out a deal between any of the parties without a large swathe of the population being righteously indignant. Either it'll be a leftwing part of the population saying that the Tories are "evil" or a rightwing part of the population pointing out that it's a government formed by the "losers of the election". For all that I'm leftwing myself, I both find the "Tories are evil" rhetoric distasteful* and find it hard to see how you can justify a Lab-Lib coalition government which doesn't have an overall majority particularly when it leaves out the party who got both most seats and most votes in the election. So if the Tories and the Lib Dems can find common ground, then that seems to make most sense in terms of actually getting a functional government. And let's face it, we need a functional government. Who knows tho, it's out of our hands now, unless we have another general election immediately to see if we the public can be a bit more coherent next time - I think the quote I've seen that I like best is someone on Radio 4 said "The British public have spoken, it's just not quite clear what they said" ;)

Interesting times :/




*I don't like it on a gut level, I strongly feel that one shouldn't demonise people simply for disagreeing with one. Whilst there are extremists at the edges of the political spectrum whose opinions do disturb me, I don't think any of the mainstream political parties fall into that category - and tolerance shouldn't only extend as far as those I agree with. But also (I think it was jaq I saw point this out) if we move to a Proportional Representation voting system then coalition governments are the way of the future and how can this possibly be a workable political system if you've already decided that one of the three main parties (looking at vote numbers from this election) is "not allowed" to be approached?
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Meriver_of_ on May 9th, 2010 05:44 pm (UTC)
Though there are more votes for the left wing parties in general than the right wing parties (despite the naff voting system) and might I note that there are plenty of countries that are ruled by minority governments (the UK has done so a number of times - more than ten - this century according to the BBC).

Oh and the history of coalition governments is rather more ragged than of minority governments - as well as coalition governments doing less savoury things (just like majority governments).