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19 November 2012 @ 02:28 pm
Andrew Marr's History of the World; Wartime Farm  
TV night last week included the last episode of the Andrew Marr series - this time taking us from the aftermath of World War 1 through to the present day (roughly speaking). So a lot of what it covered were atrocities - we had Nazi atrocities (tho not actually discussed, what was covered was Hitler's rise to power with an emphasis on the fact that not only was he legitimately elected after a failed coup but that he hadn't hidden any of his nastiness beforehand), we had Stalinist Russian atrocities, we had Communist Chinese atrocities, and we had American/Western atrocities (Hiroshima/Nagasaki). To offset that, pretty much all we got was a segment on the pill & how effective and safe contraceptives made such a positive difference to gender equality. And then a segment at the end about the future which was a bit too close to "and we're doooomed!" for comfort ;) I don't want to give the impression that it wasn't an interesting programme - just at times made for difficult watching because he did a good job of personalising the victims of these things.

Overall a good series, I'm pleased I watched it. A few times I had niggles about things being oversimplified when I knew more about the subject, but to be fair here you've got to simplify it otherwise you can't tell the "history of the world" in 8 episodes of an hour each. Despite in general not liking dramatisations of history much I thought the ones here were well done - primarily because they didn't take themselves so seriously. I also thought they did a good job of picking lesser known stories to present, or the beginning of something rather than the end point we all know (see above, about Hitler). And a good job of presenting more than a history of the Western world, although the last two or three programmes did end up there at times (I think inevitably) there always seemed to be an attempt to look at the other perspective rather than the familiar one.

I'll be buying the book, and adding it to my (growing) pile of books to read :)




We're onto the third episode of Wartime Farm, which was focused on evacuees and on Christmas 1940. The perspective on evacuees wasn't the one I'm more used to hearing about, in that it wasn't "oh those poor children sent off on their own", it was more about how the country folk reacted to it. Because after all, suddenly there they were having to find beds and food for a bunch of strangers who had different ways of life and were in many ways a burden. It did gloss over any serious difficulties, though, preferring to concentrate on how in the end it mostly worked out fine. The bits about Christmas were partly tied in with that and partly about how rationing and all the other associated problems made people cling to trying to provide as normal a Christmas as possible. Even if the turkey was actually a "murkey" made out of sausagemeat stuffing shaped like a turkey with roast parsnip legs ... They also showed us pamphlets the government sent out showing how to recycle scraps and rubbish and make them into toys, like a model spitfire made out of old tin cans. Which made me think of something Dad was telling me about when we last visited - he had a toy when he was very little which was a home-made warship to push around the floor, complete with bits of wire for antennae & funnels made out of lead pipe. Made me wonder if whoever had made it for him had got one of these pamphlets.