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08 October 2012 @ 01:34 pm
In Our Time: The Written Word Part 4  
This episode focused on the use of the written word in telling stories - both literature and history. It opened by looking at cuneiform tablets on which are written various legends including the legend of Gilgamesh. This was discussed as being one of the first known instances of literature in the ancient world & I could see J raising his eyebrows disbelievingly during it ... and sure enough, they followed up with a segment on Egyptian literature, which can be shown to have started earlier although most of the surviving fragments are from later schoolboy copies of the originals.

Then we took a quick jump to Greece & Herodotus the Father of History. Having just watched the Andrew Marr programme which also touched on Herodotus I auto-completed that in my head with "and also known as the Father of Lies" ;) I did wonder what the Chinese might've had to say about Herodotus being the first historian, I don't know but I rather suspect that they'll've had historians before him. Having said that, this is a particular definition of history - history as both a narrative & as an argument, so perhaps that is something new at that time. I really don't know. [Edit: J pointed me at a bbc news article about Sima Qian, who seems to be regarded as the Herodotus equivalent for China - he published his history of China (Shiji) around 91BC and thus post-dates Herodotus by a few centuries. So I take back that criticism.]

And then the programme was onward to medieval Europe. In particular he looked at examples from Anglo-Saxon England - both of literature (Beowulf) and of history (Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England). He made the point that this is the moving of English culture from an oral tradition to a written one - the copy of Beowulf that survives was about the size of a hardback book, so portable and able to be read by oneself or to a small group. Whereas the original context of the poem would be that it was memorised by trained performers, so you'd hear it at public recitals (or private if you were wealthy enough).

And that move from people remembering things (and maybe not remembering them ...) to writing them down leads into the next episode which is about the impact of writing & printing on science.